Nutrition Therapy Studies

Nutrition Therapy Studies


Neurotransmitter work like efficient tugbots, carrying messages from one nerve to another across a space, called a synapse. Each neurotransmitter is allowed to dock and unload its message only at specified landing sites, called receptors.

It seems that about 1/3 of Americans are born with too few receptor sites for dopamine, a powerful "reward" chemical that makes us feel life is worthwhile. If we have too few dopamine receptors, we'd better have lots of dopamine floating around in the synapse, to increase the likelihood that a dopamine molecule find the right landing site. Otherwise, with too little dopamine and fewer than normal receptors, the person's brain is going to have too few messages of well-being coursing through the nervous system. Drug addicts, therefore, may be people with too few dopamine receptors, who are seeking a missing feeling of well-being. Effective treatment must involve increasing dopamine molecules, and other feel-good neurotransmitters. These chemicals can be increased with nutritious food, exercise, and specific amino acids. 

An extensive search covering over 50 years of published literature provides consistent evidence that vitamin, mineral, and amino acid therapy in drug withdrawal and rehabilitation can reduce withdrawal symptom, increase treatment retention, improve psychological status, contribute to higher abstinence rates and improve quality of life. The typical program that includes a nutrient component has a social-educational focus and some are entirely drug free. Published outcome studies of programs that include nutrient therapy report 55-81% long term sobriety rates.